Recalling her life as a television news reporter, Jaime Fettrow-Alderfer says that journalism has enabled her to achieve so much that would have been impossible in another career. “If you are a successful journalist, you can open the door to opportunities for other people who do not have a voice,” she says. “You have a chance to make a difference through the stories you tell. When people call and say ‘thanks for telling our story,’ you know that’s why you got out of bed that day.”

 

Fettrow-Alderfer, thirty-eight, describes her work in the news business as a highly addictive pursuit. The reporting and writing process gave her an adrenaline rush every day. A journalism career also put her faceto- face with many interesting people in a job where no two days were ever alike. “I’ve always loved that aspect of being a journalist,” she recalls. “One day I would be interviewing a homeless man, and then the next day, John Kerry when he ran for president in 2004. I had the opportunity to tell some really good stories.” 

 

“As a journalism student, I know that good writing encompasses more than just adhering to grammar rules or AP style. Good writing transforms complex issues and events into effective, compelling stories. For me, writing skills have unlocked career possibilities beyond public relations and journalism.”