Watching Fishes Swim Is An Unusual But Good Way To Reduce Stress

Looking at the way fishes swim in an aquarium is much like receiving the healing benefits of nature. If you are one of those considering purchasing an aquarium for your home, check out my favorite aquarium reviews site.

We Bought an Aquarium at a Local Pet Store

While in the marine life aisle of our local pet store, my children begged a fishbowl. “It’s easier to care for a fish than a dog.” I have heard it before. But I am easily affected by their innocent and begging look.

We left with three aquariums from the pet store that afternoon. Two small five-gallon tanks and one fifty-gallon tank, suitable only for small fish. I positioned the fish tanks in different rooms of the house so that everyone can enjoy it. They are primarily intended for my kids to enjoy, but I think it was me who benefited the most from these tiny aquariums.

I was instantly attracted to the subtle sound of water, color and calm of the environment. I was facinated in how the fish followed me as I pass by. I also found that they had a positive effect on my mood. I feel calmer and less stressed. What I believed to be a coincidence is in fact a recognized way to mental health referred to as “aquarium treatment”.

Aquarium Therapy

Aquarium therapy is not a formal concept, but it is part of a bigger field known as Animal Aid Therapy (AAT). This includes using certified therapeutic animals as component of a treatment plan.

Studies show that aquarium observation can help lessen stress and anxiety, boost relaxation, and reduce heart rate and help relax muscle tension. Indeed, looking at the aquarium for only five minutes almost leads to a hypnotic effect and calms us down because of genetic predisposition that we believe is essential to survival without threatening some natural environments.

In a recent study, observing a fish tank display for 10 minutes was associated with a significant long-term decrease in blood pressure and so as heart rate.

The investigation examined the mental and physical responses of (112) random participants to a fish tank with various amounts of fish. The results showed that even when the tank was empty, people relaxed and their heart rate decreased by 3%. As fishes were added in, the benefits elevated as the blood pressure and heart rate dropped to 7% and 4%, respectively. The more fish added in, the better the people’s mood becomes. People have in fact become happier.