Will an Improved Gut Health Help My Body Fight Against COVID-19?

Pandemic COVID-19

 

You are likely aware that you want a healthier immune system to combat COVID-19. But were you aware that roughly 70 percent your immune system is really on your digestive tract? Not only does your intestine comprise the majority of the own body’s immune tissues, but it is also home to trillions of microscopic organisms. These germs — your intestine microbiome — have a significant effect on your immune system, along with your general wellbeing.

Bearing this in mind, you could be wondering: Can a healthy intestine microbiome shield me in COVID-19? Continue reading to learn more regarding your intestine microbiome, how it interacts with your immune system, and also what this could possibly mean for COVID-19.

What’s the intestine microbiome?

Your own system is currently home to trillions of germs — the individual microbiome. The microbiome contains hundreds of different kinds of parasites, bacteria, and other microscopic creatures. These germs are everywhere: on the nose, genitals, mouth, lungs, and also in your skin. However, the most significant concentration is on your own gut, as gut health plays a role in our immune system as emphasized by The Swell Score in their article as well.

The intestine microbiome is connected with a number of different health ailments, such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, dementia, diabetes, cancer, obesity, and sometimes even COVID-19. Although every individual’s gut microbiome is exceptional, certain routines (such as high diversity) appear to be related to good health.

Does your intestine microbiome play a part in your general health, in addition, it plays many crucial roles within your physique. Daily, your intestine microbiome works hard for you with:

  • Digesting your meals
  • Creating energy to the cells
  • Making hormones and vitamins
  • Slimming toxins down from your intestine
  • preventing you from foreign invaders

What factors affect my intestine microbiome?

Your gut microbiome is the end consequence of several distinct variables, such as your genes, your own upbringing, along your individual habits. And since your intestine microbiome consists of living, lively organisms, it can have the capability to modify more than every ecosystem.

Your gut microbiome may be affected by:

  • Diet
  • Antibiotic use
  • Sleeping
  • Exercise
  • Emotional anxiety
  • Infection or disease
  • High elevation
  • Noise contamination
  • Flu contamination

How would be the intestine microbiome along with also the immune system associated?

Particular immune system constructions on your gut frequently sample the material that moves through your digestive tract — such as food, drinks, and other compounds. Your immune cells assess these samples for possibly harmful germs. When a hazard is seen, these cells may send chemical messages telling that the immune system to attack.

Your gut microbes assist your immune system for this procedure in a lot of ways. To begin with, they can help teach your immune cells the way to identify foreign invaders. They’re also able to help determine the chemical signals delivered from the immune system and promote — or neutralize your own body to trigger unique areas of the immune system. Finally, your gut microbes assist your intestinal walls to remain strong, which blocks pathogens (such as viruses) from getting into your own body cells.

What exactly do we really know about the connection between the intestine and COVID-19?

COVID-19 is over only a respiratory disease. It may affect all parts of the entire body, such as your own gut. The virus which leads to COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) can immediately infect enterocytes the tissues which line your own intestines. This may result in gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and nausea. SARS-CoV-2 has also been observed in the feces (poo) of all those who have COVID-19.

 

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Can the intestine microbiome have an effect on the harshness of COVID-19 symptoms?

Possibly. Although we do not know for certain yet if the intestine microbiome impacts the seriousness of COVID-19, you will find indications that point to a potential connection.

A number of studies have proven that individuals with acute COVID-19 possess similar routines within their intestine microbiomes. As an instance, patients with acute COVID-19 had fewer “useful” gut bacteria such as F. prausnitzii, E. rectale, and Bifidobacterium. Since these microorganisms are proven to help keep your immune system, it is possible that low levels could make you vulnerable to becoming sick.

Particular groups of those who have an higher danger for acute COVID-19 may have had modifications inside their microbiome. As an instance, individuals who are elderly, or who have certain chronic diseases, are inclined to possess lesser diversity within their intestine microbiome. These modifications may be among the reasons why some folks today develop acute COVID-19, though other individuals just have a light case.

There is also evidence your intestine microbiome can affect the body’s cytokine reaction. Cytokines are small proteins that help your own cells to communicate with one another. Some scientists think that acute COVID-19 is the end consequence of a body-wide response known as a “cytokine storm.” At a cytokine storm, then the immune system releases a lot of cytokines into your bloodstream. This may result in fever, inflammation, organ failure, and even death. It is possible a strong gut microbiome might help stop a cytokine storm, and which makes it less possible that you create acute COVID-19 symptoms.

Is it true that the intestine microbiome plays a part in ‘long COVID’ symptoms?

Maybe. Over the last year, more data has come to light concerning the long-term symptoms which could result in COVID-19. These long-term ailments (or even “extended COVID”) may occur even in those who just have a mild condition.

It is possible the intestine microbiome could perform a part in these continuing symptoms. In 1 study, researchers discovered that individuals with COVID-19 not just had modifications in their intestine microbiome, but these modifications also lasted for a month following that the virus had been gone. These long-term microbiome changes may contribute to extended COVID symptoms, even after healing.

Could taking probiotics help shield me in COVID-19?

It is not apparent. Probiotics have been live germs that might have health benefits when ingested or applied to the entire body. It is possible to consume them into fermented foods such as yogurt or kimchi or simply take them as a dietary supplement. There is some evidence that consuming probiotics can decrease stomach inflammation, also promote “good” bacteria to thrive.

Now, zero probiotics are demonstrated to stop or cure COVID-19. But, there’s evidence that probiotics are useful for other respiratory tract ailments like flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) — that implies they may prove to be helpful for COVID-19 too.

More study is necessary on COVID as well as probiotics. However, in the meantime, taking carbohydrates is low-risk for many people — particularly if consumed food. As stated by the National Institute of Health, probiotics might be curable in individuals that are immunocompromised or who have acute illnesses. As always, speak with your physician before changing your diet or starting a supplement.

The Main Point

Although we do not know for certain yet if your intestine microbiome plays a function in acute COVID-19, we really all do understand that the intestine microbiome and immune system are all tightly connected. Taking good care of your intestine microbiome by ingesting a high-fiber daily diet, decreasing stress, and exercising are ways you may strengthen your total health — such as possibly boosting your immune system, and also shielding yourself from COVID-19.